FAQ

FAQ:

Can I do AIS myself?

Yes you can, as seventy percent of the AIS routine can be done by an individual. In order to feel the full benefits of AIS and attain the maximum range of motion it's essential to work with an experienced practitioner. However, it's possible to maintain flexibility on your own by practicing AIS on a daily basis.

How often should I stretch?

This depends on the individual. We encourage people to stretch everyday, in order to help maintain the gains achieved during their session with the AIS practitioner.

 How does AIS compare to Yoga or Pilates?

Many of our clients practice different disciplines within their fitness regimes.Traditionally Yoga focuses on connecting mind, body and spirit, whilst Pilates is traditionally used to focus on strengthening and stabilizing the abdominal and pelvic core.

Through using AIS we are able to identify resistance right down to the deepest fascial planes at the joints, where flexibility is determined. We lower this resistance so you can freely practice Yoga and Pilates with a lower risk of injury.

AIS will help you go further in your practice of Yoga and will allow you do certain postures, at a lower risk of injury. If your muscles are tight you will feel and see your physical limitations in your practice of Yoga. As you grow older, your body looses flexibility and is more prone to injury. AIS enables you to improve your flexibility and allow you to practice other disciplines at an optimum level.

Can anything be done for Scoliosis? 

Scoliosis has frequently been treated successfully with specific AIS exercises to stretch muscles of the trunk, neck, hips and pelvis. Stretching alone will not change the curvature and stabilize the structure. Specific isolated strength exercises for the back, hip, neck and abdominal regions are an important part of the treatment plan. The use of seat belts for stabilization provides great assistance. 

Is there any way to prevent Carpal Tunnel and can Carpal Tunnel be relived without surgery?

Prevention of carpal tunnel involves specific stretching for the neck, anterior shoulder/chest muscles and the radio-ulnar, wrist and hand muscles. AIS has been used by thousands of secretaries, computer personnel and people who do repetitive movements. During the past 35 years thousands have been relived from carpal tunnel symptoms without surgery by employing specific AIS stretching and strengthening programs.

Importance of Stretching for Runners and Walkers.

Running and walking are very strenuous activities on the body. The exercise affects almost every aspect of the muscular skeletal system from the feet to the neck. By using AIS you will actually warm up the muscles, joints and fascia of the body, preparing it for running or walking. Proper preparation for your activity will not only help decrease the chance of injury, but also to slow the process of fatigue. The more flexible the body is, the more efficient it can be. If the body is properly warmed up, the body's cardiovascular system is able to better oxygenate the muscles, decreasing the rate fatigue or lactic acid will set in. Stretching will also help to remove or decrease fatigue after running or walking by pumping the lactic acid from the muscles, thus removing the toxic material from the muscles that cause them to be sore and tight.

Golf Stretching.

Stretching is a very important part of golf, not only to prevent injuries, but also to improve the power exerted in golf. Golf is a power sport, which means the greater the amount of strength or power you can exert with the golf club to the ball, the greater the velocity the ball will travel and therefore the farther you can hit the ball. Power = the amount of strength you can exert over a great range of motion divided by time. What this means is, if you can take the strength that you already have and use it through a greater range of motion, this will allow you to achieve a greater power potential. Most golfers who are known as "long ball hitters" are able to achieve greater motion on their back swing and range of motion in the hips and torso region, to achieve greater power on the active swing motion. So flexibility is an integral part of golf. Increasing your flexibility will also help to prevent injury on the deceleration phase of the swing as well. If the muscles are more flexible when the shoulders, arms and torso have to decelerate the swing, there will be a decreased chance of injury.

Lower back Problems.

Most lower back problems stem from a couple of areas. One area that attributes to lower back problems are weak abdominal muscles. Many people with lower back problems have very weak under developed abdominal muscles. It's very important to build up the abdominal muscles using abdominal crunches or half sit-ups also known as "pelvic tilts". The strengthening book "Active Isolated Strengthening: The Mattes Method", goes into great detail working with the lower back and abdominal muscles. Also, tight hamstrings can attribute to lower back problems.

Hamstrings.

The hamstrings are best stretched when incorporating the quadriceps. Use of a rope or strap is helpful. The distal end (insertion) of the hamstrings should be stretched before the proximal (origin) end. The "Bent Knee Hamstring Stretch" is used to stretch the distal attachment. To become more specific the lower leg is firstly rotated inwards, to stretch the inner distal hamstrings. Rotate the lower leg outward for the distal outer hamstrings. Incorporate the " Straight Leg Hamstring Stretch" for the muscle belly and proximal attachments. The knee must remain extended, using a rope or strap to assist. After the initial straight leg stretch, perform movement with full leg rotated inward and move leg towards the sternum, to stretch the oblique fibers of the inner hamstrings. Rotate leg outward and move leg towards opposite side shoulder, to isolate oblique fibers of biceps femoris (outer hamstring). 

How do I stretch my calves?

Traditionally the calves are stretched from a standing position by leaning against a supportive wall, fence etc. The main problem with this technique is that the gastrocnemius (calf) muscle, which is stabilizing the knee and ankle joints is performing a lengthening contraction to stabilize both joints, therefore the muscle is not relaxed.

The best stretching position for a relaxed calf muscle is performed in a sitting position. Place a rope or strap around the ball of the foot and keep the knee straight. Lift the foot and ankle backwards and assist with the rope. For greater specificity turn the foot inward 20 degrees and lift the ankle back to stretch the outer belly of the calf. Next turn the foot outward 20 degrees and pull the ankle back to stretch the inner belly of the calf. As the calf becomes more flexible, lean the upper body forward 15-20 degrees to provide greater stretch potential.